Panier

WORKING THE LAND AND PROTECTING ITS NATURE

 

Our land and our nature are precious gifts we need to protect.

For the Bayle, Carreau and Jourdan families, this principle has long been the driving force of the vineyards’ success. Sustainability is at the centre of all operational decisions.

Thanks to these efforts, we have received two certifications: High Environmental Value (HVE) and Terra Vitis. These certifications guarantee that our processes follow best practices and our wines are made in the best conditions to safeguard the balance between Man and nature.

 

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Preserving natural resources, as well as protecting our health, is the main goal of the Terra Vitis certification.

 

THIS COMMITMENT IS BASED ON 6 PRINCIPLES

 

1 – RESPECT OUR ENVIRONMENT

We respect our water resources and the biodiversity of our soil in order to grow vines that will yield good and healthy grapes.

2 – PROTECT OUR VINES AND GRAPES

We observe and study the vines carefully to help their natural defences. We only step in when there is no other way to ensure a successful crop.

3 – RESPECT PEOPLE

We strive to provide our employees, farm neighbours and all people with a good environment to protect their health.
We also provide training for all the people working in our vineyards.

4 – INNOVATE AND CHANGE

Year after year, we try to stay ahead of future environmental and health requirements. To do this, we develop and test new techniques with the help of all of our vineyards’ highly qualified staff.

5 – RESPECT OUR COMMUNITY

Because we are environmentally conscious, we make sure all the waste from our estate is reused or recycled.

 6 – RESPECT THE CONSUMER

Each stage of production is audited by an independent organisation. The auditor certifies each vintage. This certification gives our consumer full transparency on our winemaking process from the vine to the glass.

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The HVE label is regulated by the Ministry of Agriculture.
This label aims to define and promote environmentally friendly farming practices.

 

IT FOCUSES ON FOUR MAIN AREAS
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BIODIVERSITY

Biodiversity and agriculture must go hand in hand, because working the land means interacting with nature constantly.

This is why integrating biodiversity into our production techniques is so important when it comes to mitigating the negative impact some farming practices can have on the environment (fertilisation, tillage, crop protection products, mono-cropping, etc.) and maximising biodiversity’s benefits (regulate water, filter pollutants, prevent erosion, pollinate, etc.).

To enhance functional biodiversity, is it crucial to preserve and integrate areas of the farm dedicated to cover crops in order to ensure the survival and reproduction of beneficial insects.

strategie-phytosanitaire
PLANT PROTECTION STRATEGY

Throughout the year, crops are exposed to pests and disease, as well as weeds that can deprive the vines of the nutrients they need. To reduce the impact of these threats on the vines, every vineyard needs to have a clearly defined strategy. The first course of action is the use of plant protection products.

In viticulture, these products usually fall into two categories: herbicides, which will be used to manage weeds, and non-herbicides, which will treat pests and disease problems.

While these plant protection products can help, it is important to use them with caution so as to preserve the environmental balance, and to use natural techniques where possible.

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FERTILISER MANAGEMENT

Fertilisation is an essential part of growing vines, as it not only provides essential nutrients for the vines, but also ensures the soil is healthy.
Organic matter plays a key role, particularly in the storage and regulation of the vine’s nutrients, the quality and stability of soil structure, the soil’s ability to retain water and its biological properties. Fertilisation must therefore be treated with utmost care and dedication.

The environmental challenge of fertilisation lies not so much in limiting the inputs, but rather in enhancing the quality of those inputs and limiting the use of synthetic products.

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IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT

Water management is a key element in the day-to-day of most vineyards. As droughts become more common, crops are more frequently subject to water deficit. Although more and more water is needed every year, it is crucial to address how we use this resource.

To optimise water use and conservation, there are three components to take into account: the plant, the soil and the climate. The plant must be watered according to its specific needs, which will vary depending on the climate, the type of soil, the anticipated yield and other aspects such as soil management. The real challenge is to develop practices that optimise the use of the water that is naturally retained in the soil and to limit additional watering (irrigation).